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Safety & Security for
Meetings & Events 

Chapter 2
Event Safety and Security Planning


 

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Oct 4, 2019

Helpful tips for establishing communication with your event safety and security team and how to empower them to situational assessment.

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Chapters


 

2

EVENT SAFETY AND SECURITY PLANNING

Learn who to bring to the table when planning your next event, how to develop clear guidelines for public safety and how to avoid confusion on the event day by learning pre-planning strategies.

 


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    Event Safety and Security Planning Blogs

    2 - Event Safety & Security Planning
    Helpful tips for establishing communication with your event safety and security team and how to empower them to situational assessment.
    2 - Event Safety & Security Planning
    Your event safety and security plan is your guide to operations and establishes tactics and procedures for all of your event stakeholders.

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    EVENT SAFETY
    AND SECURITY PLANNING

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop an Event Safety and Security Plan to guide the operations of the event; to establish plans, procedures and guides for supervisors, event/venue staff, volunteers, etc.; and inform public safety partners. This should be based on a Risk/Threat/Vulnerability (RTV) Assessment. SEE RTVA.

     

    Should also have a separate Emergency Action Plan. SEE EAP

     

    Objectives:

    • A plan to address reasonably foreseeable risks and threats.
    • To protect the safety, security and health of your patrons and staff/contractors/volunteers.
    • Assist staff in effective implementation. Essential to an effective event.
    • Reduces legal liabilities

     

    Implementation:

    The plan should incorporate the following components based upon your Risk/Threat/Vulnerability Assessment as applicable to your type and size:

    • An overview of the RTV
    • Assessment
    • Situational/operational awareness
    • Command and control
      • Venue/event operations
      • Public safety operations
    • Event management
      • Disruptions (delay/suspension/change)
      • Evacuation/shelter-in place
      • Cancelation
    • Staging, rigging
    • Audiovisual
    • Insurance coverage
    • Weather planning
    • Event staffing and assignments
    • Load in – load out
    • Intelligence
      • Collection/sharing
      • Fusion/analysis
    • Safety and security
    • Fire, EMS and public health
      • Medical support
      • Bomb threats/IEDs
      • Hazardous materials
    • Access Control
      • Ticketing/credentialing
      • Pedestrian/vehicular
      • Prohibited items
      • Deliveries/waste removal
    • Robbery/theft/cyber protection
    • Investigations
    • Transportation and parking
    • Traffic management
    • Lodging
    • Behavioral issues
    • Public information plan
    • Signage
    • Pre-event agreements
    • Drones/unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    The complexity of the plan will depend upon the size of the event, attendees and RTV assessment.

     

    The amount of time required for planning will vary depending upon the size, type, location, complexity, duration and RTV assessment. Smaller events a week or two, larger events several months.

    1. Best Practice:

    Ensure that event policies are consistent with venue rules, policies as well as local/state jurisdiction laws and ordinances.

     

    Objectives:

    Provides guidance for staff on authority levels and the difference between enforcing policy and enforcing law.

     

    Implementation:

    Consult with legal counsel and local/state jurisdictions as well as the venue.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Smaller companies may not have access to inhouse legal teams. But it will still be helpful to the event organizer to form a cross-departmental group to review the policies internally.

    1. Best Practice:

    Assign a liaison with local FBI JTTF and state or regional Fusion Center since it is the best way to be alerted to any intelligence of potential terrorist activity/threat to the venue/event.

     

    Objectives:

    Stay aware and be proactive.

     

    Implementation:

    For high-profile events, consider having a member of staff get a security clearance through DHS or FBI JTTF, so they may receive classified information for planning and response.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    In the United States, contact the FBI and state or regional Fusion Center(s) to inform them of your security sensitive event and see if they are aware of any potential issues. If meeting outside the U.S., the same procedure should be followed with the relevant foreign agency.

    • Best Practice:

    Conduct area Crime Analysis to objectively determine what problems exist on event days and nonevent days in the vicinity of your event/venue.

     

    Objectives:

    • To assess and prepare for any potential criminal activity.
    • To properly establish venue precautions and communicate with attendees regarding personal safety before, during and after the event.
    • Aim to answer questions like: Is the area more/less conducive to crime than average? What types of crimes occur in the area during and independent of venue-related activities?

     

    Implementation:

    Law enforcement can provide a crime analysis and gather input from their local counterparts. Local law enforcement agency responsible for the venue would be the appropriate agency for this information.

     

    Today this information is available online for most cities/counties at least in the U.S.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable regardless of size.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Continually maintain relevant records for reference and analysis over time.

    • Public facilities may retain this info as they have terms and timeframes that they must follow for records maintenance/retention

     

    Objectives:

    For assessment, planning and legal liability.

     

    Implementation:

    Implementation of a standardized operations/ incident log can create a common accessible framework for staff reporting and record-keeping.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Procedure is independent of size.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Encourage or develop close coordination between venue, lodging, transportation and local law enforcement.

    • Staff the outer perimeter entry/control points with event security

     

    Objectives:

    • To ensure access control and security of participants and spectators.
    • To establish collaboration and communication framework and protocol for when law enforcement is primary entity and when event/venue security is primary entity

     

    Implementation:

    Coordination is essential to effective security and safety, with clear roles and responsibilities.

     

    Do not expect law enforcement to provide event/venue security responsibilities - if threats require their presence it serves as a deterrent and to address order issues, so uniformed law enforcement, would work along with venue security staff.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Coordination with local law enforcement regarding an event can preemptively drive a greater public safety presence and enforcement campaign outside of an event area.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Venues should consider fixed or mobile barriers deployed between the venue and all major adjacent roadways immediately surrounding the venue to slow the approach of traffic and provide a managed point of vehicle ingress on event days and/or consider closing them.

     

    Objectives:

    Creates a buffer zone between the venue and general traffic. Barriers protect pedestrians and bystanders alongside these roads. By using these barriers, vehicle access points are limited, which makes vehicle verification less stressful. Also serves as an impediment to Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VBIEDs), and vehicles used as an attack weapon.

     

    Implementation:

    If roads are just closed with plastic/wood barricades, they should be manned by law enforcement.

     

    In areas where traffic cannot be significantly slowed on its approach, and if justified by the risk assessment, the deployment of more substantial barricades to reduce the vulnerability to forced vehicle entry (intentional or accidental).

     

    Reinforce areas that are vulnerable to forced vehicle entry with substantial barricades (i.e. bollards, retractable wedges, anti-ram fences, large trucks or buses, Jersey barriers, reinforced concrete decorative planters, etc.).


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This will be driven by your Risk Assessment. Participate population will also be a factor. Minus any threats, this is not necessary for smaller events.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    When possible, arrange to have marked law enforcement vehicles parked randomly outside critical facility assets.

     

    Objectives:

    Serves as a deterrent, even if unmanned.

     

    Implementation:

    They have to be parked somewhere when not on patrol.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Based on threat level and critical assets. May not be necessary for all events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Ideally each venue should have Concentric Circles of Security (CCS), with generally Inner, Middle and Outer perimeters.

    • The INNER circle would typically encompass everything from the venue exterior wall/fence inward
    • The Green/Dressing Rooms, Stage, Meeting Rooms, Conference and/ or Exhibit Hall within the INNER is considered a separate High-Security Area
    • The MIDDLE circle would typically encompass everything from the exterior wall/fence outward to at least 100ft (if possible)
    • The OUTER circle would typically encompass everything from 100 foot line to the property line or other arbitrary border a minimum of 500 feet should be established where possible

     

    Objectives:

    To protect VIPs, talent and mass gathering areas. Each circle will have different security requirements/ controls and staff trained to avoid confusion. Generally, this information should be made available to attendees to avoid confusion as to access. Each circle/level allows for containment of a situation.

     

    Implementation:

    When implementing CCS, the type of venue as well as geography, environment, number of patrons, type of event and surroundings will dictate the number of circles, line drawing and distance for each segment.

     

    The inner perimeter may be a room, or a hall or the interior of an entire venue; it depends upon the criteria above.

     

    In instances where there is not 100 feet of clearance, vulnerable areas and possible threats must be identified and alternative arrangements made to secure the venue’s perimeter through methods such as utilization of barriers, vehicle and pedestrian routes, and placement of law enforcement/ security guards and other event parking/traffic staff.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    The Risk Assessment, the size, impact, and history of the event, the number of attendees and history of prior events will drive the size and complexity of the security plan and defined CCSs.

     

    Inner Perimeter = Exterior-of-house

     

    Middle Perimeter = Front-of-house

     

    Outer Perimeter = Back-of-house

     

    Access and credentialing will likely vary between each area.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Place a renewed emphasis on middle and outer perimeters.

     

    Objectives:

    Recent world terrorist events indicate that as the inner perimeter becomes hardened violent extremists target individuals in the outer perimeters.

     

    Implementation:

    Implement protective measures for soft target areas surrounding venue.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable to all size events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Maintain emergency ingress/egress routes for first responders and public safety vehicles.

     

    Objectives:

    Ensure rapid, unrestricted response both inside and out.

     

    Implementation:

    Pre-designate these routes with public safety so they are aware.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable to all size events.

    • Best Practice:

    Conduct a venue inspection each time before the venue doors open for your event to remove all unauthorized materials, vehicles and people to create secure MIDDLE and INNER perimeters.

     

    Results of the inspection should be reported to the venue’s security department or Operations Center prior to opening. The results of each pre-event inspection should be maintained as documentation that the inspection was conducted, and the area was controlled at a point in time prior to patron entry.

     

    Objectives:

    Prevent unauthorized materials, vehicles and people from disrupting the event to the greatest extent possible.

     

    Implementation:

    Conducting the inspection will be driven by event type, history, size, intelligence, threat and risk factors unique to the event, especially if there are known threats or knowledge of similar (recent) activities.

     

    Should something be subsequently found, a timeframe can be established to predict approximate placement time.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This will require close coordination with the venue managers. Event manager and venue manager should conduct this jointly.

     

    At a minimum, staff should walk the entire facility for events (for 1,000+ attendees or smaller high-profile events, you should consider using bomb dogs and/or metal detection).

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Know the neighborhood located within 100 feet of the venue prior to the event and evaluate potential threats, to the greatest extent possible.

     

    Objectives:

    This is to prevent potential assailants from using nearby buildings/objects for an attack.

     

    Implementation:

    This may not be possible at all venues, but an inspection should certainly be conducted if threat level is elevated for any reason. At minimum, consider whether they present a potential threat. Particularly, buildings that look down upon your outdoor events.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This will be driven by threat intelligence and serves as a deterrent.

    1. Best Practice:

    Secure the INNER perimeter so that no one without a ticket, pass or credential is permitted entry through venue/event doors, gates or entrances.

     

    Objectives:

    • To maintain control over the area of your event protect people and property.
    • To ensure only those authorized are granted entry and to protect materials/ merchandise in exhibit halls.

     

    Implementation:

    Wristbands have been found to work well for temporary staff. Use different colors for different days/events.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to all size events.

    • Best Practice:

    All open access points should be staffed. Only authorized individuals permitted to enter the venue/ event.

    • Make sure participants are who they say they are by requiring a photo ID during check-in

     

    Objectives:

    Without effective access control there is no control.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This should be standard operating procedure regardless of venue/event size, however, access may be reduced for ingress/ egress within fire codes based upon event size and attendance.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Event day staff (paid, subcontracted, and volunteers) should use a designated entrance(s) to check-in and receive their credential and post orders after providing a valid photo ID. Then have a checkout process and recap of the day with their supervisor.

     

    Objectives:

    Controls entry and authentication of event staff, separating them from attendees. Reduces confusion.

     

    Implementation:

    For large venues/events with large staff, use more than one designated entry point organized by role.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to all size events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Prior to event, have media/press provide a list of all personnel requiring access into the event venue. Upon entering, media personnel should identify themselves with photo ID so that they may be issued a credential. All broadcast bags should be checked, inspected and tagged.

     

    Objectives:

    Reduces risk of unauthorized persons gaining entry and prevents unwanted material/items from being brought in the adversary will know if these individuals come and go without any checks.

     

    Implementation:

    Tagging of bags/containers allows for staff to verify that it has been properly inspected.

     

    Loose or inadequate checks and controls create opportunities to introduce threats and/or hazards.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This should be conducted with no exceptions, despite inevitable complaints, regardless of venue/event size.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Secure specific areas to prevent post-event access. Such areas include:

    • Conference/exhibit halls
    • Concessions stands, kitchens, and storage rooms
    • Equipment rooms
    • Green, dressing, locker rooms
    • Class/meeting rooms
    • Staff offices
    • Suite level(s)
    • Electrical/mechanical rooms

    To reduce theft and damage while shutting down the venue, a checklist should be used.

     

    Objectives:

    The event is not over until at least 30 minutes after all attendees/ presenters/ entertainers are off the podium/stage. Safety and security requirements for the venue may remain in place for several hours after all spectators have departed which incorporates teardown.

     

    Implementation:

    Ensure workers/volunteers understand that the event is not over when the last buzzer sounds, but when event operations say it is. Instill diligence throughout the entire event.

     

    Often more issues arise on egress, than on ingress.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to all size events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Post signs near all entrances clearly identifying prohibited items.

     

    Dependent upon state law, ban firearms or weapons from being allowed in the event/venue (include a list of all prohibited items). Include signs at “Park and Ride” to event/venue locations, event shuttle pickup points and other mass transportation locations.

    • Educate mass transit/ tram/bus drivers (and an assistant) to be on the lookout for prohibited items so patrons have an opportunity to return items to their hotel/vehicle before getting on bus/train
    • Prohibited items should also be conveyed and enforced with all vendors, staff and contractors

     

    Objectives:

    • Avoids confusion concerning what is and is not permitted. Avoids attendees from showing up at venue entrances with prohibited items causing them to discard their prohibited items or making them take the items back to their vehicle.
    • Also, avoids issue at entry to venue.
    • Improves the guest experience.

     

    Implementation:

    State firearms laws will impact the implementation of venue policies regarding possession, especially on public property.

     

    Determine how to deal with off-duty law enforcement officers attending as they may be in possession of a firearm at events.

     

    Also use public address systems and video/digital boards should be utilized to communicate to the attendees the protective measures, procedures, restrictions, prohibited items and evacuation routes as they enter the event/venue.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable to any size venue but would be scaled to the size of the event to prevent backlogs. For smaller venues with no adverse intelligence, random screening may be appropriate.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Include signage that advises attendees that, “at the event or venue’s discretion, if an individual appears to be intoxicated they will be denied entry.”

     

    Objectives:

    Provides legal notification/ warning for denied entry.

     

    Implementation:

    Staff need to understand how to identify and handle intoxicated parties, and what it means to enforce this notice.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable to all size events.

    1. Best Practice:

    Allow only authorized or credentialed vehicles to be parked within the MIDDLE or INNER perimeters, and then only after they have been screened prior to entry. Check and inspect all broadcast/media vehicles and insure they are properly credentialed.

     

    Objectives:

    • Vehicular traffic is a pedestrian risk and can also be used as a weapon (i.e., VBIED or ramming).
    • This area is very vulnerable and should be monitored and secured where appropriate.

     

    Implementation:

    Authorized vehicles may include law enforcement/ emergency vehicles, sponsor vehicles, broadcast equipment trucks and vehicles driven by event/venue employees, staff and officials. ALL vehicles should be checked and credentialed.

     

    Particular attention must be paid to the presence of unsolicited emergency vehicles such as ambulances. Make this part of the pre-event planning so marketing can notify sponsors/vendors of changes well in advance of the beginning of the event for load-in/load-out.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is particularly applicable to large events with an elevated threat profile. This is normally under the control of the venue; therefore, close coordination is required. As an event organizer you want to make clear who is assuming risk for decisions involving vehicular traffic and parking. (May or may not be under the control of the venue, could be the city/county or private entity).

     

    Several venues are using License Plate Readers (LPR) that are synced with local law enforcement databases. This helps in identifying banned persons and wanted/stolen vehicles. This is particularly good for large risk averse events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Inspect and credential (label/tag) ALL (including public safety) vehicles allowed inside the MIDDLE or INNER security perimeters.

    • Broadcast vehicles (at large events) should be located in a designated and secure compound(s) with its own perimeter. A security officer should be deployed at all times at the broadcast/ media compound while media is present. Entry to the media area should be controlled and all media should be credentialed.
    • Roads should be blocked off when necessary and special event-day traffic procedures should be instituted to allow for vehicle ingress/ egress

     

    Objectives:

    • Credentialing/labeling avoids the confusion of whether a vehicle has been inspected upon entry and can also denote which vehicles are permitted where.
    • Assists in preventing VBIEDs.
    • To avoid use of “cloned” or stolen public safety vehicles.

     

    Implementation:

    This should be a relatively small number of vehicles. Colored stickers (changed for each event) could be used.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Not necessary for small events or those with no reasonable threat. Not applicable to all events or meetings as many may have no vehicular to the inner and/or middle perimeters. Also, may have not broadcast/production vehicles.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    For INNER perimeter entry and for venue facilities that offer UNDER VENUE - UNDERGROUND PARKING, vehicle checks should be conducted by trained staff using, at a minimum, visual inspection (inside and out) using undercarriage mirrors for VBIED’s prior to each vehicle entering the inner perimeter/underground parking.

     

    Objectives:

    Larger vehicles present a greater risk based upon their size, capacity and volume of fuel tanks.

     

    Implementation:

    This can be time consuming, so consider using explosive detection canines to expedite the process and use mirrors to augment in case of an alert.

     

    Remember working time limitations for bomb dogs.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    The RTV assessment, participants, the size, impact, history of the event, number of attendees, etc. will drive the level of vehicle screening.

     

    This is applicable to any size venue but would be scaled to the size of the event to prevent backlogs. For smaller venues with no adverse intelligence, random screening may be appropriate.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    If the venue has parking inside the venue, each vehicle should be searched, and its occupants screened. The use of trained explosive detection canines is suggested under these circumstances, in addition to truck searches and the use of undercarriage mirrors. The sale of non-event daily parking permits should be prohibited in such areas.

     

    Objectives:

    Larger vehicles present a greater risk based upon their size, capacity and volume of fuel tanks.

     

    Implementation:

    This should be strictly adhered to and enforced due to the magnitude of damage/ impact of a VBIED. This can be time consuming, so consider using explosive detection canines to expedite the process and use mirrors to augment in case of an alert.

     

    Remember working time limitations for bomb dogs.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Some may want to do this only if specific intelligence indicates a threat. However, there will not always be forewarning, and while it may be low incident it is high impact. So, if you don’t screen, you must be willing to accept the risk.

     

    Some jurisdictional fire codes prevent vehicles from parking in or close to the venue due to possible fire/explosion of fuel tanks.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    For venues with parking immediately adjacent to the venue (usually middle perimeter) ensure all vehicles within 100 feet of venue wall are searched both inside and out (use bomb dogs, if possible).

     

    Objectives:

    Larger vehicles present a greater risk based upon their size, capacity and volume of fuel tanks.

     

    Implementation:

    greater risk based upon their size, capacity and volume of fuel tanks. Consider these high-risk areas. Reserved parking should not be transferable.

     

    Remember working time limitations for bomb dogs.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    The RTV assessment, clientele, the size, impact, history of the event, number of attendees, etc. will drive the level of vehicle screening.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    All trucks and delivery vehicles seeking access to the INNER, MIDDLE or underground parking or unloading areas should be inspected visually and with undercarriage mirrors for hazardous materials, weapons and explosives. Depending on the configuration of the venue and the risks, the contents of the vehicle should be inspected by the security staff (visually or bomb sniffing dogs) prior to permitting any truck or delivery vehicle entry to the ramp leading to the service level or any area below the event/venue.

     

    Objectives:

    Protection efforts to prevent the introduction of hazardous/prohibited/ explosive items to the venue.

     

    Implementation:

    Ideally, all such deliveries except perishables (i.e. ice, fresh baked goods, flowers, etc.) should be delivered at least 24 hours prior to the venue opening, to avoid tying up venue day resources.

     

    If possible, consider restricting deliveries to certain times on the day of the event (i.e. two hours prior).


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is particularly important for large events, 5,000+ attendees and/or high-profile VIPs or those events with a high-risk profile.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    All sponsorship displays or concession vehicles within the venue’s INNER or MIDDLE perimeters, must comply with local fire codes and, at a minimum, comply with the following:

    • Inoperable gas cap
    • Disconnected battery
    • Minimal fuel in tank
    • Possession of keys to the vehicle by a designated security or facility team representative
    • Unattended sponsor vehicles should not impede egress

     

    Objectives:

    Protection efforts to prevent the introduction of hazardous/prohibited/ explosive items to the venue.

     

    Implementation:

    All vendors should be made aware of these requirements.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to all size events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Monitor parking lots to ensure they are accessible for EMS and fire vehicles. Ensure parking aisles are not blocked.

     

    Objectives:

    Ensure emergency vehicle access.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This should occur regardless of event size or type.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    For lots adjacent to the venue event area, remove all unauthorized or unidentified vehicles as part of the inspection process prior to opening of the event.

    • Conduct at least a cursory screening of all vehicles entering a controlled parking lot
    • Parking lots should be inspected daily (for multi-day events), and unattended/ unaccounted for vehicles not removed within a reasonable amount of time should be investigated and removed as soon as possible

     

    Objectives:

    Unattended vehicles can pose a problem. Individuals who are intent on doing harm will notice if vehicles are left in lots without a response.

     

    Implementation:

    Parking lots should be cleared and closed prior to an event for safety and security purposes. This allows you to start with a controlled environment.

     

    This is a best practice, but vehicle removal may not be possible at adjacent properties not under facility control. Parking lots that support other activities should be closely monitored.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This may not always be possible depending upon the multi-functions of the venue and the RTV assessment.

     

    For larger events or those with security concerns.

     

     

    • Best Practice:

    Prohibit vehicular use inside the INNER Perimeter of the facility during the event

     

    Objectives:

    It is a different dynamic when the venue is loaded.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    All deliveries (entries and exits) should be prescheduled and documented. Entry should be centralized to a single point, so they can be checked against the list of scheduled deliveries.

    • Deliveries should be limited at event time, whenever possible
    • Deliveries should be scheduled through a single entrance, where possible
    • Delivery of hazardous materials (such as propane) should be scheduled during times of low-occupancy (i.e. overnight or early in the morning)

    For High-Risk Events:

    • Advanced scheduling should be completed with company, the driver’s license of the driver and helper, and the contents listed on the manifest
    • All delivery vehicle drivers and helpers must produce government-issued photo identification and must sign in at a control point. The previously submitted driver’s license must match that of the person making the delivery, and the previously submitted manifest must be reconciled with the contents of the vehicle at the time of delivery.
    • Keep a record of each vehicle, driver and helper(s) entering or leaving the venue by use of a log or permit system. Records should be retained through the end of each season/calendar year.

     

    Objectives:

    • Limit possible accessibility of VBIEDs or chemical agents and the possibility of a vehicle used as a weapon.
    • Propane delivery trucks making refill deliveries pose a significant risk.

     

    Implementation:

    Particular attention should be given to armored truck deliveries (i.e. ATM service, food service delivery trucks, etc.).

     

    Consider taking a picture with a smartphone camera of the driver and their driver’s license.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is normally under the control of the venue; therefore, close coordination is required. As an event organizer you want to make clear who is assuming risk for decisions involving deliveries.

     

    Many venues are multi-purpose/multi-event; therefore, much coordination is required based upon your event RTV Assessment and any other overlapping events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    All waste removal should be scheduled, but not during the event.

    • Do not place dumpsters/ trash receptacles under or adjacent to structural supports
    • Use sufficient dumpsters/ receptacles that will allow for pickup after the event
    • Trash receptacles should be emptied regularly with contents placed in dumpsters

     

    Objectives:

    • Coordination
    • To prevent a dumpster/ trash receptacle from being used as an IED

     

    Implementation:

    Consider sealing trash bags with color-coded zip-tie or similar.

     

    During periods of high threat, exterior trash receptacles should not be placed within 100 feet of the venue.

     

    Consider using blast resistant receptacles. Plexiglas trash cans that are transparent should be considered.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    For larger events or those with security concerns.

    1. Best Practice:

    Have a program and procedures to address securing cash collected during the event from robbery or employee theft.

    • Establish a central bank at the venue that receives monies collected from tickets, parking, and concessions (food and merchandise) and vendors
    • Should have at least two people
    • All cash movement from the event bank to a financial institution should be via armored car
    • Event bank should have CCTV coverage of access points, collection and counting areas and exchange and storage areas
    • Separate the cash storage area from cash receipt area
    • Cash should be carried in non-descript packaging concealing the contents from public - keep low key, don’t draw attention to the moving of money
    • Establish a policy that no sales location can amass more than $2,000-$5,000 before transferring it to the bank
    • Event banks, with large amounts of cash, should have armed guards or law enforcement in the bank
    • Bank should not be easily accessible from outside venue.

     

    Objectives:

    • Robberies at events/exhibitions and their on- site banks have occurred many times.
    • Pre-planning will help reduce this risk and mitigate issues.

     

    Implementation:

    Most of these thefts are based on insider information. Conduct scheduled and unscheduled employee bag checks.

     

    Technology such as security cameras and alarms should be used in the central collection or counting room.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable if accepting cash for event entry, merchandise, etc.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Coordinate with law enforcement to address response procedures for robbery or theft.

     

    Objectives:

    Reduce danger to patrons, event staff and law enforcement.

     

    Implementation:

    See EAP.


     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Establish procedures to prevent and address credit card information theft/ skimming.

     

    Objectives:

    Prevent loss of information or funds.

     

    Implementation:

    Include procedures in Event Operations Plan and coordinate them to participating public safety personnel. See EAP.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop and implement a cyber-security plan.

    • Event/Venue Systems
    • Web/social media presence
    • Registration
    • Ticketing/credentialing
    • Client profiles
    • Permitting
    • Life Safety systems
    • Lodging
    • Logistics and Contracts
    • Transportation
    • Event Management
    • Venue Management
    • Electronic signage
    • Facilities/Equipment Management
    • Audio/Visual
    • Rigging and stage

     

    Objectives:

    In today’s world this has become great risk. To protect people’s personal information their life safety

     

    Implementation:

    DHS, FBI and InfraGard can provide input/support and documents for developing the plan.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is size independent and requires attention from event planning through post event.

    1. Best Practice:

    Ensure that all operating software and hardware is regularly updated, patched and tested (i.e. registration, credentialing/ticketing, lodging, payments, life safety, medical, incidents, incident management, etc.).

     

    Objectives:

    • Software currency to protect the integrity of the event.
    • Prevent intentional misinformation.
    • Protect against malware, viruses, ransomware and data loss.

     

    Implementation:

    Requires competent technical staff and coordination.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Larger events = bigger consequences.

     

    Both mobile and static devices, also during communications connectivity.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Install and maintain current cyber-security technologies and techniques (user authentication, firewalls, virus and spyware protection, encryption, etc.).

     

    Objectives:

    Must protect Personal Identifying Information (PII), healthcare data (HIPAA) and PCI compliance.

     


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is relevant for event venues and the presenting organization.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Backup all information on a regular basis and store in a secure offsite location.

     

    Objectives:

    To prevent data destruction, loss or taken for ransom.

     

    Implementation:

    Daily (preferable) or at least weekly backups, will prevent the event/venue from becoming a victim of ransomware attacks.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is size independent and essential for business continuity.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Immediately report all breaches/intrusions/denial of service/Ransomware attacks to the FBI/law enforcement.

     

    Objectives:

    The sooner law enforcement can address the attack the better since it can limit system data damage loss.

     

    Implementation:

    DHS, FBI and InfraGard can assist with training programs and security tips.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to all size events.

    • Best Practice:

    Provide regular user awareness training on security, policy, procedures, responsibilities, threats and incident reporting for staff and volunteers.

    • Document the training
    • Ensure records retention

     

    Objectives:

    • Frequently, a lack of knowledge information results in unintended consequences.
    • Proof for potential litigation.

     

    Implementation:

    DHS, FBI and InfraGard can assist with training programs.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    All employees with any access to event systems/ applications, regardless of device type.

    1. Best Practice:

    Virtual - User authentication/password access controls should be created that is “need to know” based.

     

    Objectives:

    Prevent unauthorized access.

     

    Implementation:

    Insider threats are the most prevalent. Access for all terminated/departing employees should immediately be cancelled.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    All access control procedures are independent of size.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Physical - Access to information technology facilities should be controlled, so only authorized personnel may enter.

    • Access for all terminated/departing employees should immediately be cancelled

     

    Objectives:

    Insider threats and social engineering are the most prevalent.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to all size events.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Cyber – Data should be encrypted.

     

    Implementation:

    May be the responsibility of contracted vendors, IT teams or credit card processing companies.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable to the transmission of any personally identifiable information (PII).

    1. Best Practice:

    Have staff prepare a report on each complaint/ dispatch or adversarial interaction with a patron.

    • Create a documented process for intake of safety and security concerns from all sources speakers, vendors, attendees, staff, etc.
    • Use database format to easily research parameters

     

    Objectives:

    • For defense in potential litigation and maintain under a records retention program.
    • Creates a record of concerns and allows for planned response and resource allocation.

     

    Implementation:

    The initial capture of information on an incident could be written on a card, documented or dictated on to a smartphone, then subsequently transcribed on to an incident report.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is required regardless of size of event.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Photograph and/or video ALL individuals that are questioned, detained and/ or ejected.

     

    Objectives:

    For identification and event organization protection from incidents, accusations and litigation.

     

    Implementation:

    Many state laws may require that this policy be posted.


     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Cite and record policy offenders, advise them that they may not be permitted to attend events for a year from the date of the incident, based upon offense.

    • Document all written trespass warnings and share as Be On the Look Out (BOLO) with law enforcement and venue personnel

     

    Objectives:

    Need appropriate records for enforcement, statistical analysis and potential litigation.

     

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Ensure accountability of all ejections through identification, documentation and a photograph.

     

    Objectives:

    Prevents ejected offender from causing additional problems and liability to the venue/event. It also ensures the safety of others.

     

    Implementation:

    Establish a “Phone a Friend” policy that requires any individual ejected for intoxication and who is not arrested, to phone a sober friend or family member to take responsibility for them.

     

    Document via government identification to whom the intoxicated person was released and have the person sign a waiver accepting responsibility for the intoxicated individual.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This should occur regardless of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Create a written transportation management plan that addresses all manner of transportation modes public and private, use (from booking to delivery), boarding to delivery for your events to include dropoff/parking.

     

    Objectives:

    To manage/control patron travel that is under your responsibility

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Regardless of size, all events should have a transportation management plan. Small event, smaller plan; larger event, large plan. Complexity is a direct correlation to the number of attendees, scope of event, modes of travel and RTV Assessment.

    1. Best Practice:

    Private vehicles, taxis, rideshare, coaches/buses, subways, trains, airplanes and/or ferry boats may be used to travel to and from the event. Coordinate and anticipate the volume and safety/security of passengers.

    • Need to heighten security and conduct briefings on
    • unusual behavior, unattended/abandoned items, terminal/hub/station attendants
    • During peak periods increase law enforcement presence
    • Use these modes of transportation as an opportunity to communicate with attendees using signage or announcements concerning prohibited items, weather and other event info

     

    Objectives:

    Transportation safety and security awareness through training and monitoring.

     

    Implementation:

    This is based on the environment (urban, suburban, or rural), what types of public transportation are available, and by the size of the event.

    • These become potential targets because of the numbers of passengers, loading and unloading areas that causes patrons to congregate
    • May require additional units to handle surges

     

    For larger events: Metrics related to passenger volume over time for various modes and routes may be available from transportation providers. This information will be very beneficial for planning.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Only law enforcement, public safety, DOT or public works can legally regulate traffic on public roads.

     

     Coordination is essential for medium to large events otherwise our public safety partners have no idea of what is about to impact their environment.

     

    Often pick-up/drop-off points will be under event and/or venue control.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Consider and plan for those you can control, for evacuation/shelter concerns at these transportation hubs/terminals/ stations.

    OR

    Work with those you use but don’t control to ensure they have a plan in place.

     

    Objectives:

    • Transportation Anticipate issues and plan responses.
    • To work with transportation providers to establish contingency routing, pick up and rally points and share in advance.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Regardless of event size.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Communicate evacuation/shelter-in-place plans to your patrons.

     

    Implementation:

    Include in overall EAP.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Regardless of event size.

    • Best Practice:

    Consider these evolving modes of transportation when planning your event and how your patrons may employ them

    • Pay particular attention to drop-off/pickup areas for these modes at your venues
    • Work with city/regional transportation department and rideshare service providers to establish designated drop off and pick up locations that mitigate traffic impact and allow for safe onboarding

     

    Objectives:

    Patron protection.

     

    Implementation:

    These become potential targets when the numbers of passengers, in loading and unloading areas causes patrons to congregate.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is becoming a dominate mode of transportation and thus may require more preplanning. Consider in context with parking lots, bus/train drop-off/pick-up, pedestrian traffic and the overall perimeter.

    1. Best Practice:

    If it is necessary to move participants to/from transportation hubs using venue provided buses and/or trams exclusively, then the event/venue must ensure their safety and security.

     

    Objectives:

    Secure and safe movement.

     

    Implementation:

    This primarily becomes a coordination and scheduling issue.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is going to depend on the environment and size of event.

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Conduct background screening on drivers of these vehicles and credential both driver and vehicle.

    • Include insurance insulation in transportation contracts

     

    Objectives:

    Litigation protection.

     

    Implementation:

    Example: Avoid having individuals with extensive problematic driving records or DUI offenses from driving these vehicles or if minors are involved making sure that drivers/attendants don’t have sex crime offenses.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is independent of event size.

     

     

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Conduct searches of these vehicles prior to their use.

    • Need to heighten security and conduct briefings on strange behavior, unattended/abandoned items
    • Document training/briefing
    • Create signage to remind patrons to take items with them

     

    Objectives:

    Provide safe transportation

     

    Implementation:

    Consider creating laminated, two-sided cards with vehicle search procedures for drivers.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable to larger events in which RTV is high.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop a detailed plan for vehicular flow into and out of the parking lots.

     

    Objectives:

    This addresses the most disruptive aspect of the event on the community

     

    Implementation:

    Define and agree upon the event traffic perimeter, area of responsibility or oversight in the planning process.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is for larger events with heavy personally owned vehicle use.

     

    Crowd flow patterns will differ between arrival and departure.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    In the age of new transportation modes (rideshare services) consider centralizing a separate drop-off/ pick-up for these modes that fits into the overall traffic management plan.

     

    Objectives:

    Simplifies a location, is more user friendly, provides a safer environment and reduces congestion to traffic patterns.

     

    Implementation:

    This brings greater clarity to arrival and departure.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Fits all size events.

     

    Crowd density will be higher at these areas on egress than on ingress and could present more of a target.

    1. Best Practice:

    Consider fixed or mobile barriers around the areas immediately adjacent to the venue. Block cross roads along pedestrian flow as necessary.

    • Reinforce areas that are vulnerable to forced vehicle entry with substantial barricades (i.e. bollards, retractable wedges, anti-ram fences, large trucks or buses, Jersey barriers, reinforced concrete decorative planters, etc.)
    • Establish proactive measures to thwart the use of vehicles as a weapon, especially in areas of congregating pedestrians

     

    Objectives:

    • Creates a buffer zone.
    • This has become a weapon of choice.

     

    Implementation:

    If roads are just closed with plastic/wood barricades, they should be manned by security/law enforcement.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is for large events and those that are outdoors and in or adjacent to streets requiring closures.

    1. Best Practice:

    All parking areas under venue oversight should be manned and controlled, or, at a minimum, patrolled.

     

    Objectives:

    The venue is responsible for the areas they control, own and lease.

     

    Implementation:

    Additional considerations for nighttime events include lighting, vests and flashlights for staff.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is for large events and especially with elevated risks/threats.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    All parking areas should be illuminated (from dusk to dawn) and, at a minimum, follow standards and requirements in applicable zoning ordinances and codes.

    • Portable lighting should be utilized in unlit areas or those not sufficiently lit by permanent lighting fixtures

     

    Objectives:

    For safety and security purposes.

     

    Implementation:

    For those venues with CCTV coverage, consider fixed or mobile platforms to monitor the parking lots.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Especially for events.

    1. Best Practice:

    All lots should be patrolled or manned from the time the parking lots open until they are closed.

     

    Objectives:

    For the protection of patrons and the reduction in legal liability for venue/ events parking lots.

     

    Implementation:

    Could use roving patrols, elevated observation platforms and/or CCTV.

     

    Establish security patrols (security vehicles, bicycles, roving personnel, etc.) in the parking lots and perimeter of the venue.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is advisable regardless of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Consider pre-paid parking since it reduces potential theft of cash and risk to the toll collector/parking attendant.

    Objectives:

    Reduces risk.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    If personally owned vehicle (POV) parking is significant or an issue.

     

    Also depends on venue and neighborhood RTV

    1. Best Practice:

    Venues should employ protective measures (i.e. fencing, bollards, and enclosures) around exposed utilities such as transformers, natural gas lines, water values, air intakes, generators and telephone switch boxes to protect them against attack and/or damage.

     

    Objectives:

    To protect these utilities as they can be intentionally or are sometimes damaged accidently which has cascading effects.

     

    Implementation:

    Many ways to accomplish this through various technologies.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    A RTV assessment will help identify what needs to be implemented when, where and how.

     

    Where and when appropriate, this is something that the venue should do and provide the event promoter/organizer with assurance of implementation/ compliance.

    1. Best Practice:

    Have some full-time facilities personnel on-site during events at venue for maintenance issues and repairs; they should remain onsite until release by a supervisor.

    • Keep a record of who (repairman) is authorized to access the HVAC, mechanical, electrical, water, and gas/fuel/cooking systems with their contact information
    • Venue security personnel should accompany all repair persons as practical and necessary

     

    Objectives:

    • When things happen, it is important to know when systems were last serviced/repaired and by whom.
    • Also, need to maintain an up to date listing of service providers with contact numbers.

     

    Implementation:

    Ensure they have photo credential.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Especially important for large events.

     

    Where and when appropriate, this is something that the venue should do and provide the event promoter/organizer with assurance of implementation/ compliance.

    1. Best Practice:

    Secure and protect with locks and/or tamper proof seals and/or monitoring via video surveillance.

    Objectives:

    Prevent tampering.

     

    Implementation:

    Let’s you know through a quick observation if tampering has occurred.

     

    Also, relatively inexpensive.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is advisable regardless of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Test backup systems monthly and/or in compliance with local codes.

    Objectives:

    Prevents surprises.

     

    Implementation:

    Should include load and recommended warranty testing.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is advisable regardless of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Inspect and test all systems before every event and assign security staff or utilize monitoring devices to safeguard vulnerable systems.

    Objectives:

    Prevents surprises.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    The larger the event the more important.

    1. Best Practice:

    Conduct annual structural and physical inspections (to include equipment) and document inspection results/findings along with any remedial action necessary/taken.

    • Maintain these records for seven years (or as required by state laws)

    Objectives:

    Preventive measures and liability protection.

    Implementation:

    This should become part of the risk/threat assessment.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Where and when appropriate, this is something that the venue should do and provide the event promoter/organizer with assurance of implementation/ compliance.

    1. Best Practice:

    Know how to shut off air circulation systems. If local fire codes allow, consider installing a central emergency shut off switch for the HVAC system.

    • Security should be assigned to ensure doors are locked and if elevated threat, to guard vulnerable systems, including air intakes

     

    Objectives:

    Ventilation safety to prevent chemical/biological inhalation poisoning.

     

    Implementation:

    All HVAC, mechanical, gas/ fuel systems and other critical systems should be inspected and protected with locks and/or tamper proof seals.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is advisable for all venues.

     

    Event producers should familiarize themselves with the HVAC zones of the venue and use your contract to restrict unauthorized access to return air systems and return pathways to front-of-house areas of the building.

    1. Best Practice:

    Mailrooms and loading docks should not share a return-air system or return pathway with other areas of the building.

    Objectives:

    Ventilation security safety to prevent chemical/biological inhalation poisoning.

     

    Implementation:

    In older facilities, where existing physical infrastructure makes it cost-prohibitive to retrofit separate air-handling systems; air sampling technology should be available for detecting biological and chemical hazards. Consider offsite mailrooms.

     

    State National Guard Civil Support Teams can assist in detection/monitoring.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for large events with high risk.

     

    This prevents the introduction of biological and chemical agents delivered via mail/package delivery causing death or illness.

    1. Best Practice:

    Inspect and monitor air handling intake vents monthly.

    • Document inspections

    Objectives:

    Ventilation security safety to prevent chemical/biological inhalation poisoning.

     

    Implementation:

    Rely on facilities personnel for this and require they report pre-event.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Event producers can include these requirements in their contract.

    1. Best Practice:

    Employ physical or electronic monitoring of HVAC (air intakes).

    Objectives:

    Ventilation security safety to prevent chemical/biological inhalation poisoning.

     

    Implementation:

    Both for tampering by an individual or for monitoring of hazardous materials in the air.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is advisable regardless of venue size and essential for high profile events.

    1. Best Practice:

    Maintain current contact information for all utility providers (electric/gas/ water/fuel) in the venue maintenance office and/or Operations Center.

    Objectives:

    This will eliminate contact time. Reduce risk.

     

    Implementation:

    Both paper and digital.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    For venues, regardless of size.

    1. Best Practice:

    If anticipating potential issues at the venue or event, consider having utility company personnel onsite (i.e. adverse weather/threat).

    Objectives:

    This will eliminate response time. Reduce risk.

    1. Best Practice:

    Venues should test the systems and the emergency backup systems (under load) before each event.

    • Service personnel should be onsite for the duration of major or high-profile events
    • Work with venue security to ensure that personnel are available on standby to perform elevator lockout procedures should the need arise
    • Document test

    Objectives:

    • To protect the safety of patrons
    • This will eliminate response time

     

    Implementation:

    This is a venue responsibility, but event producers/ organizers must hold them accountable.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable regardless of venue or event size if elevators and/or escalators are present.

    1. Best Practice:

    Test emergency backup systems (under load) before each event or request venue provide documentation of the last scheduled backup system test before the event.

    • Document test

    Objectives:

    To protect the safety of patrons and employees.

     

    Implementation:

    Ensure that venue generators are sufficient to support emergency systems to include Operations Center and cameras as well as emergency lighting.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Should be conducted regardless of venue or event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Require identification of all talent, speakers, entourage and officials and appropriately credential them.

    Objectives:

    Safety of patrons, talent and staff.

     

    Implementation:

    Current intelligence and history will provide some predictive ability in scaling necessary protective actions and manpower requirements.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Should be required regardless of venue or event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Post a knowledgeable security guard on the green room, dressing/locker room door.

    Objectives:

    Talent security.

     

    Implementation:

    How much security will depend on the talent and the RTV?


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Some talent may have their own security detail, and you will have to coordinate with them.

    1. Best Practice:

    Prevent high-profile or controversial talent from entering or exiting in close proximity to hostile crowds, as it is not only unsafe for them, but for patrons and security personnel as well. 

    Objectives:

    Potential problems with attendees, grabbing, pulling, throwing, spitting on/ at talent as they enter the stage/meeting.

     

    Implementation:

    Demonstrations, history, and risk will dictate security requirements.

     

    Autograph seekers may also present an issue.

     

    Any attempts or actions should be a clear violation of your code of conduct and may be a violation of assault laws.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    File complaints for arrest of any violations of law and remove anyone violating the established Code of Conduct.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop written policies on how staff will respond to disturbances in conjunction with all participating law enforcement agencies, event managers and venue operators for:

    • Celebratory disruptions/ rioting
    • Civil disturbances/demonstrations
    • Drunk and disorderly
    • Sexual harassment
    • Stage encroachments
    • Loitering
    • Theft
    • Fighting
    • Illegal drug use or possession
    • Thrown items
    • Use of vulgar language
    • Inappropriate/prohibited signage

    Objectives:

    • Be proactive, since at some point in time these issues will arise and frequently end up in litigation.
    • Have an established written Code of Conduct as applies to attendees, talent, and staff that is enforceable.

     

    Implementation:

    Alcohol tends to be a major contributing factor.

     

    If alcohol is permitted, the strong enforcement of overindulgence will help reduce potential issues.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    These policies should be prepared regardless of size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop a written plan to prevent each of the above, and then practice it with staff.

    Objectives:

    Prepare staff–prevention is preferable to response and litigation. Also, less costly.

     

    Implementation:

    Use the Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA).

     

    Anticipate various scenarios and conduct at least a table-top exercise.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Based upon event history, size, threat and current environment.

    1. Best Practice:

    Adopt a Code of Conduct, post signage, advertise it and enforce it to discourage inappropriate behavior for your events.

    • Ensure staff compliance

    Objectives:

    Establish and communicate what conduct is unacceptable and what actions are to be taken if that code is broken.

     

    Implementation:

    Enforcement should be fair and consistent.

     

    Staff training is key!

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is regardless of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Implement and advertise the “See Something, Say Something” program.

    Objectives:

    Be proactive and instill situational awareness.

     

    Implementation:

    Include today’s technologies, such as texting and social media, as a vehicle for informing participants/ patrons and for reporting violations. Resources are available from DHS and FBI


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Ensure staff and patrons know how and to whom to report.

    1. Best Practice:

    Train your team in Behavioral Intervention to address negative behavior issues.

    Objectives:

    Proactive anticipation.

     

    Implementation:

    Especially for larger events and those with a history of behavioral issues. At many venues with a high-profile event this may be handled by law enforcement or non-law enforcement security staff.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Good skill for an event planner as it helps in dealing with all types of people.

    1. Best Practice:

    For large and high-profile events pre-plan and practice responses to all potential incidents, based upon past events.

    Objectives:

    Clarify skills, roles and responsibilities.

     

    Implementation:

    Where possible collaborate with local public safety.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Especially important for large events and those with high RTV.

    1. Best Practice:

    Use social media monitoring for intelligence and early warning.

    Objectives:

    Predict and prepare for potential issues.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    A very effective tool for situational awareness, especially for larger events and those with sensitive issues.

    1. Best Practice:

    Fully document all actions taken and retain documentation.

    • Retain for seven (7) years or as required by state law

    Objectives:

    For litigation purposes and lessons learned.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Regardless of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    For large and high-profile events use a mixture of uniform and plainclothes officers whenever possible.

    Objectives:

    Deterrence, observable help and situational awareness.

     

    Implementation:

    Uniforms serve as a deterrent and a visible point of contact for patrons needing help; while plainclothes serve as quasi-invisible eyes and ears that can provide intelligence and early warning and response.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    For most meetings, conferences and conventions this will require hiring off-duty officers.

     

    What off-duty plainclothes officers can or cannot do at events varies between jurisdictions.

    1. Best Practice:

    Identify and have accessible to event Operations Center and/or key staff, a list and locations of area hospitals and fire stations.

    • Have a minimum of one Fire Unit and one EMS Unit with two certified EMT’s onsite for events of 15,000+

    Objectives:

    This will eliminate response time and may save lives.

     

    Implementation:

    Close collaboration with public safety can help facilitate this, sometimes at no cost.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    Depends upon the size of the event, history, geography, community, weather conditions, attendees, threat information, etc. that could require scaling up.

    1. Best Practice:

    Require pre-approval and provide pre-notification to public safety of specialty attractions (i.e. fireworks, pyro, parachutists, aerial shows/fly-overs, etc.).

    Objectives:

    • These are a higher risk; thus approval, preparation and staging are required by municipal authorities.
    • Reduces legal liability.

     

    Implementation:

    This sometimes requires weeks of advance notice.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This should be non-negotiable, regardless of event size and will require special response equipment.

    1. Best Practice:

    Affix responsibility for the following food and beverage protective/preventive measures that should be considered:

    • Ensure all food service distributors/vendors/ concessions are reasonably secure, inspected and licensed
    • Inform food distributors (pre-delivery) that any box, package or container that is open or appears to be tampered with, will be refused
    • All food and beverage deliveries should be recorded with: date, time, vehicle license number, company and driver name (view and record ID data from driver’s license)
    • Inspect all packages/ containers for tampering and if tampering found, refuse.
    • Notify law enforcement and food distributors (in that order) of actual or suspected tampering incidents
    • Conduct or require background screening on all food service employees/ volunteers
    • Ensure all food service vendors and employees comply with local health standards, regulations, laws and appropriate inspections are conducted
    • Ensure food workers are trained in recognizing food contamination and reporting procedures
    • Ensure all food service vendors and employees are trained on “See Something, Say Something”

    Objectives:

    • Prevent and respond to food borne issues.
    • Protecting food supply from intentional or unintentional contamination.

     

    Implementation:

    The local Health Department can assist with food/water borne issues. Include local Health Department food inspectors in the EAP planning and in formal operations plan, provide communications contact in event of a tampering or to report other patron food/drink issues.

     

    This is true for event-provided food and drink as well as vendor-provided food and drink for sale.

     

    This will require close coordination with food service personnel frequently provided by the venue or caterers/ vendors and their compliance with public health authorities.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    If it is your event, the responsibility will ultimately fall on you for due diligence reliability.

     

    This is especially true for high-profile events with significant attendees.

    1. Best Practice:

    Create clear alcohol management policies. Specify that intoxication will not be tolerated at the venue/ event and enforce it.

    Objectives:

    • Lack of policy increases your liability.
    • Public intoxication/disorder.
    • Lack of enforcement.

     

    Implementation:

    Since alcohol is a major contributor of disruptive behavior this is a must, also it is a key contributor to incidents ending up in litigation.

     

    Policy needs to be communicated to attendees.

     

    Local standards and practices may be different than at other events/venue.

     

    See Crowd Dynamics/ Management (CDM) - Alcohol Management


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is independent of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    Ensure employees serving alcohol are of age and have been trained in state laws and in recognizing signs of impairment and how to refuse service.

    • Document training and testing

    Objectives:

    • Employee knowledge.
    • Reduce liability.

     

    Implementation:

    Utilize Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management (TEAM) training for ALL event staff.

     

    Event Producers can ensure that liquor liability insurance is issued by serving entity which should put liability squarely on serving entity and insulate the event producer if they are not the directly responsible for serving alcohol.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is independent of event size.

    1. Best Practice:

    As part of the EAP (for both event and venue), develop, review, train and exercise weather safety plans for all types of adverse weather and response which includes: sheltering-in-place, evacuation and re-entry after an evacuation.

    • Develop a weather situational awareness plan for each event
    • Discuss and practice shelter-in-place/evacuation procedures
    • Decide under what circumstance a game or event will be delayed or cancelled
    • Include communications technologies during testing
    • Conduct exercises to identify gaps
    • Create timeline for monitoring and contingency preparedness
    • Establish a rally point (if no operations center) in advance for senior staff who can make the appropriate executive decision to delay or cancel an event due to weather

    Objectives:

    Being prepared and planned for all manners (i.e. heat, snow/ice, hail, wind, rain, flooding) of adverse weather. Use a weather service.

     

    Implementation:

    Ensure close coordination between event and venue.

     

    FEMA and National Weather Service (NWS) can assist in planning and training for weather conditions.

     

    See EAP.

     

    See National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Venue Preparation Checklist

     

    Numerous commercial products exist to monitor weather and alert patrons. Also, local broadcast stations have meteorological equipment and staff.

     

    Can be trained and tested through a table-top exercise.


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for all events but is particularly important for outdoor events.

    1. Best Practice:

    Simplicity is key-staff will need a simple plan to follow in the event of severe weather conditions.

    Objectives:

    Timely implementation is critical when employing the weather safety plan.

     

    Implementation:

    Good planning, concise directions, familiarization/ training of staff and public safety team are essential.

    1. Best Practice:

    Weather monitoring is essential to ensure safe events.

    • Establish trigger points to take action based upon current circumstances
    • Ensure there is sufficient lead time as adverse weather approaches so appropriate action can be implemented in a timely and safe manner

    Objectives:

    • Being prepared for all types of adverse weather (i.e. heat, snow/ice, hail, wind, rain, flooding and lightning).
    • Planning and practice.

     

    Implementation:

    Various methods of monitoring are available through public emergency management, as well as through TV and radio stations and commercial products such as smartphone apps.

    • If storms are forecast for the day of the event, review safety plans before the event and identify the responsible officials and chain of command to implement the safety plan
    • You could utilize a subscription weather service to receive alerts as well as tapping into a local National Weather Service. Have contact information for on-duty meteorologist as a backup


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for all events.

     

    Particularly important for outdoor events.

    1. Best Practice:

    For outdoor events, seek Storm Ready Certification by FEMA/National Weather Service.

    Objectives:

    Weather mitigation preparation.

     

    Implementation:

    Refer to https://www.weather.gov/stormready/

    1. Best Practice:

    Use weather monitoring and lightning detection tools along with local observations to help determine proximity of lightning and which safety actions to implement (per NOAA).

     

    Direction and speed of approaching weather should be accounted for along with locally developing storms that may form nearby. Must establish distances based on the speed of the approaching storm and the time it takes to evacuate the venue or shelter-in-place.

     

    FLASH-TO-BANG CONCEPT Begin counting when sighting a flash of lightening. Stop counting when BANG of lightning is heard. Divide the count by five to determine the distance to lightening in miles.

     

    EXAMPLE: Flash to Bang = 30 seconds 30 divided by 5 = 6 Lightning is 6 miles away

     

    Objectives:

    Lightning monitoring, alert and response

     

    Implementation:

    Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch: A watch indicates conditions are favorable that severe weather may develop. A time period is associated with the watch.

     

    Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Warning: A warning means severe weather has been detected and may be imminent in the area. A time period is associated with the warning.

     

    Flash Flood Watch: A watch indicates developing conditions are favorable for flash flooding in the watch area. Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is in progress, imminent, or likely. Water is expected to rise rapidly. Refer to: www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov When lightning is detected within fifteen (15) miles of the venue:

    • Notify management and event officials of elevated lightning monitoring
    • Venue management notifies all staff of potential for a delay designated staff are stationed to direct patrons as necessary
    • In these cases, the speed and direction of storm movement should be determined and the time that it will enter an eight (8) mile radius of venue. Evacuation from the facility or a shelter-in-place should begin if it appears the thunderstorm is moving toward venue.
    • Venue management notifies all staff of the potential for a delay designated staff are stationed to direct patrons as necessary

     

    When lightning is detected within twelve (12) miles of the venue:

    • Venue management and officials are notified of impending lightning threat
    • Venue management notifies all staff of impending delay or suspension designated staff are stationed to direct patrons as necessary
    • Shelter-in-place begins or continues. If more organized thunderstorms (supercells, squall lines, bow echoes) are headed for venue, evacuation may be required

     

    When lightning is detected within eight(8) miles of the venue:

    • Management and event officials are notified of nearby lightning threat and an event suspension is implemented
    • Event officials suspend activities
    • Event management notifies all staff that event has been suspended due to lightning designated staff are positioned to direct crowd as necessary
    • Evacuation of venue begins all patrons, officials, performers are directed to nearest pre-designated lightning-safe shelter


    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for all sizes of outdoor events.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop, train, and follow the Sheltering Plan in EAP.

    • Ensure there is sufficient sheltering capacity for the total numbers of patrons, participants and staff
    • Ensure staff is familiar and trained on the plan

    Objectives:

    A plan and pre-event familiarity is a must.

     

    Implementation:

    Plan, train, exercise.

    SEE EAP

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for all event sizes.

    1. Best Practice:

    Sheltering by its very nature is temporary but must be accommodating based on the cause for sheltering and the anticipated numbers requiring shelter. Evaluate all potential sheltering areas against all possible incident types to determine their ability to offer sufficient protection from various perils (i.e. thunderstorms, lightning, hail, tornados, ice, flooding, hazardous chemical release) along with the total number of individuals each area can safely accommodate.

    • If substantial space is not available, enclosed motor vehicles (not optimal) can provide shelter as long as individuals do not touch the metal framework during a thunderstorm
    • Determine who has the authority to make the decision to shelter-in-place and how it will be communicated
    • Length of time to shelter-in-place is going to be a factor and must be considered

    Objectives:

    • Plan ahead to prepare for all eventualities.
    • List options by name.

     

    Implementation:

    Making the decision to shelter-in-place or evacuate during an incident is a complicated process and requires input from various entities. Things to consider are the facility, the number, distribution and condition of the patrons, participants, staff, the hazard involved and the anticipated response to that hazard.

     

    Pre-planning is a must.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop, train/exercise, and follow the Evacuation Plan in the EAP.

    • Have an accurate estimate of how long it will take for total evacuation of the venue (it should not be more than 20 minutes)
    • Ensure staff is familiar and trained in the Plan

    Objectives:

    A plan and pre-event familiarity is a must. Event staff must be familiar with and trained in the evacuation plan.

     

    Implementation:

    Plan, train, exercise.

     

    See EAP

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for all event sizes.

    1. Best Practice:

    An evacuation requires a plan for moving patrons, participants, staff out of the hazardous area.

    • Identify the individual who has the authority to make the decision to evacuate

    Objectives:

    Know the what, where, why, when and how, realizing the impacts of each by name.

     

    Implementation:

    Making the decision to evacuate, shelter in place, or relocate during an incident is a complicated process and requires input from various entities knowledgeable in the geography, surroundings and structures, the size, distribution and condition of the patrons, participants, the hazard(s) involved and the anticipated response to that hazard. That is why it must be pre-planned. Sometimes the best course of action is NOT to evacuate, but this must be an informed decision.

    1. Best Practice:

    Identify a Family Reunification Center(s).

    Objectives:

    A facility or area where attendees are reunited with their families and friends.

     

    Implementation:

    No matter the size of the event this should be planned for and scaled accordingly.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    The bigger the event the more significant the planning.

    1. Best Practice:

    Identify and coordinate transportation needs and solutions to move participants to assistance center(s).

    Objectives:

    Transportation.

     

    Implementation:

    Pre-plan needs.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Staff and train sufficient personnel to handle (or contract out) the assistance center(s).

    • Ensure sufficient communication capability

    Objectives:

    Manpower and communication.

     

    Implementation:

    Red Cross/Salvation Army or other community-based organizations can possibly assist. Check with them in advance for capability.

    1. Best Practice:

    Planning for evacuating/sheltering/relocation should specifically identify decision-making levels and authority, with one person on-site who will make the decision.

    • Develop decision trees and trigger points

    Objectives:

    Avoid confusion and assign responsibility to an individual by name who will be on site.

     

    Implementation:

    Make sure when implementing the Plan, that enough time is included for staff to be in place when the evacuation order is given to guests/ attendees.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This needs to be closely coordinated between event director and venue director. This should be established pre-event independent of staff rank based on the senior staff member most likely to be in a position to make the decision in a timely manner should the need arise.

    1. Best Practice:

    Provide advance, realtime information on severe weather to patrons (i.e. video board(s), ribbon board(s), social media, local radio announcements); allowing them to make personal decisions before any mandatory sheltering or evacuation order is issued.

    Objectives:

    Awareness.

     

    Implementation:

    Also utilize TV and radio outlets that carry the event to communicate with patrons still in transit to the venue and to provide updates if they are standing by following an evacuation.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop a policy and process for re-entry after weather related evacuation.

    • If sheltering takes place in a secure area without opportunity for the introduction of prohibited items, rescreening is not required
    • If sheltering takes place in an unsecured area that allows for the potential introduction of prohibited items or unscreened individuals, Re-screen patrons who re-enter venue/event

    Objectives:

    Reloading venue after evacuation.

     

    Implementation:

    Staff should be trained on this procedure.

     

    If screening performed, rescreen on re-entry

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Applicable for any size events.

    1. Best Practice:

    Have a written plan that is part of the EAP that dictates criteria, role/responsibilities and identifies who makes the call, on evacuation or not, for a bomb threat.

    Objectives:

    • Bomb threats are highly disruptive and cause mass confusion over what process to follow, who makes the decision and when to evacuate and how to notify personnel and attendees.
    • Can be very manpower intensive.

     

    Implementation:

    SEE EAP

     

    Follow ICS Unified Command structure.

    • Have pre-written communication messages for patrons
    • Define assessment process (FBI and BATF are resources)
    • Define evacuation process as set forth in the EAP Evacuation Plan for such an incident
    • Define who is responsible, venue or local government

     

    Train receptionist and Operations Center staff on FBI/ Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (BATF) Bomb Threat checklist for receiving calls. Coordinate with local law enforcement to trace/ track incoming calls.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is applicable for all event sizes.

     

    Law enforcement can assist in preparing this plan.

    1. Best Practice:

    Make use of the ICS Unified Command for assessment, decision process and response.

    Objectives:

    Leverage expertise.

     

    Implementation:

    Follow NIMS ICS Unified Command structure.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop a threat assessment team.

    Objectives:

    Avoid confusion and lack of expertise.

     

    Implementation:

    FBI is a great resource for this.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Provides necessary expertise for decision making.

    1. Best Practice:

    Use Bomb Threat Caller Checklist and train staff who may receive calls.

    • Install caller identification and/or coordinate phone call trap capability on landline phone.

    Objectives:

    • Reduces response time.
    • Identify resources in place based on threat assessment.

     

    Implementation:

    FBI, BATF and DHS offer checklists.

     

    Consider that the threat may come via Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP) or social media

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Ensure that all incoming threats, whether telephonic or via other media, are properly recorded and preserved for at least two calendar years following the year in which the threat was received.

    Objectives:

    For prosecution/litigation purposes.

     

    Implementation:

    Seek advice from legal counsel on number of years to retain recorded documentation required (recommended) by local jurisdiction.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Have pre-written announcement messages available to notify patrons as to what actions shall be taken under various circumstances.

    Objectives:

    So announcements are ready to go during a crisis.

     

    Implementation:

    Can be used for social as well as traditional media messaging.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This saves time in the heat of a crisis and avoids confusion or misinformation.

    1. Best Practice:

    For high-profile/highrisk events, if resources are available, conduct bomb sweeps of facility, buses, nearby parking lots, media compound, food/concession deliveries. Once completed, maintain control through:

    • Access control
    • Bag checks
    • Credentialing
    • Lockdown once cleared
    • No re-entry policy

    Objectives:

    Search and secure.

     

    Implementation:

    Certainly, for large-scale events resources should be made available.

     

    If evacuated for a bomb threat and re-entry is considered, must conduct a full venue search, and re-screen before re-entry

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This is either contracted or provided by local/state law enforcement.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop procedures and train event staff on suspicious items response and handling.

    • Establish a code so that staff doesn’t use the words bomb or suspicious item when reporting over the radio or phone
    • All staff should be trained in bomb threat response

    Objectives:

    • Be prepared.
    • This serves to protect both staff and patrons.

     

    Implementation:

    Besides law enforcement, the military has EOD resources. For planning purposes bomb dogs on average have roughly a 20 minute active search capability, then must be rested for about 30 minutes to be effective.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Certainly, for events with known threats, resources should be made available.

    1. Best Practice:

    Venue or event planner should develop written processes and procedures (part of EAP) with the fire department(s) to deal with fire alarms.

    Objectives:

    Often fire alarms are ignored or are false alarms. Must be resolved without causing panic or unnecessary delays.

     

    Implementation:

    SEE EAP

     

    A command level fire department representative should be in the Command Center for all events with 10,000+ attendees, at a minimum.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    For all size events.

    1. Best Practice:

    Plan should include the decision-making process to resolve alarms. Identify the individual (by name) who will make the decision to evacuate.

    Objectives:

    Cautionary action.

     

    Implementation:

    Local fire department(s) can and should assist in this process.

     

    Some hotels do not evacuate meeting rooms if the alarm is on a sleeping room floor. The plan should include this information to clarify the course of action that will occur if an alarm is activated in the building.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    The Plan must deal with the ability to monitor and override the system (i.e. post a fire fighter at alarm panel and send an event staff member to the alarm point).

    Objectives:

    Turned off fire alarm system, in lieu of using an on site fire fighter.

     

    Implementation:

    Pre-plan with fire fighter/ Fire Marshall on site. Many large venues have firemen on site.

     

    Some state or local laws require evacuation if fire alarm goes off.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    For large, high-profile events a fireman on site is recommended.

    1. Best Practice:

    Plan should define the process to make notifications (patrons/talent/staff).

     

    Implementation:

    Specify methods of notification.

    1. Best Practice:

    Designate and authorize the Public Information Officer (PIO) for events to respond to the media and the general public in case of an incident to establish a single authorized, authoritative voice.

     

    Objectives:

    Avoids confusion when an incident occurs, of info from multiple sources.

     

    Implementation:

    Use the most experienced individual, regardless of organization/agency, who will be available on site during the event.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    For weather, criminal, terrorist incidents public safety PIOs will respond to the media, but if you want your entity (event/ venue) represented with your message it is incumbent upon you to have your designated person.

    1. Best Practice:

    Develop policies and procedures to advise the media and general public of the situation, and to defuse rumors along with panic.

    • Address how the venue emergency notification system is applied during an event
    • Address use of social media, who is responsible for disseminating public safety info during events

    Objectives:

    Effective continual communication minimizes confusion and protects you and your clients’ brand.

     

    Implementation:

    This may require a collaborative effort since different organizations may have different rules and goals.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    For large events establish protocol for PIOs from relevant departments (police, EMS, Fire, City Government, and event PIO) to coordinate messaging and timing to ensure consistent, relevant communication to press, public and patrons.

    1. Best Practice:

    Venue should have a written plan for dealing with hazardous/toxic material exposure (i.e. fuels, propane, chemicals, fertilizers, garbage, sewage, etc.) as part of the EAP.

    • Ensure that appropriate individuals are trained on the plan

    Objectives:

    • Ensure safety for workers, participants and patrons.
    • Reduces liability

     

    Implementation:

    See EAP

     

    The local fire department and FEMA can assist with training and documentation. OHSA can also provide information on this subject.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Event planner should ensure that the venue has such plan.

    1. Best Practice:

    In conjunction with local public safety partners, venue should coordinate a decontamination plan.

     

    Objectives:

    Be prepared.

     

    Implementation:

    The local fire department and Emergency Management would implement as necessary.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Venue should establish a Hazmat Response Team that is trained to the Hazmat Level 2 defensive level, or a reasonable substitution such as local fire department.

     

    Objectives:

    • Staff expertise.
    • Reduces legal liability.

     

    Implementation:

    Important for larger venues, smaller venues should try to have at least one person HAZMAT trained and works closely with the local fire department.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Venue will be responsible for assisting with spill clean-up/containment efforts.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Ensure that hazardous materials are not stored in close proximity to the event.

    • Prevent fume buildup

    Implementation:

    Conduct inspection prior to event-consider requesting local Fire Marshall to accompany inspection team.

    1. Best Practice:

    Establish a written policy in conjunction with the venue regarding permitted and prohibited items that will or will not be allowed in your event/venue property.

    • Items to consider prohibiting: coolers, bags, strollers, backpacks, containers, alcohol, explosives, chemicals, flammable liquids, weapons, outside food or beverages (except as required for authorized medical needs)
    • Post a list of prohibited items in parking lots, transit points and entrances to venues

    Objectives:

    • Must be written and communicated to be legally enforceable.
    • To reduce confusion and prevent patrons from getting to the gates/doors with prohibited items.

     

    Implementation:

    Communicate these policies and, that patrons consent to these searches as a requirement for entry to the venue/ event.

     

    If pre-entry screening is conducted, all primary screening should be conducted by nonlaw enforcement security staff and backed up by law enforcement where possible. Be prepared for patrons to dispose of prohibited items in bushes, trash receptacles, and under vehicles outside of the door/gate/perimeter.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    It is advisable to have this policy for all sizes and types of events. What is prohibited/permitted may vary by type of event/attendees/venues/location.

    1. Best Practice:

    Once established, publicize policy in the broadest manner possible to include the screening/inspection process and penalties for breaches.

     

    Objectives:

    Policy awareness.

     

    Implementation:

    Should be part of your online and document packets for patrons.

     

    1. Best Practice:

    Have a procedure in place and train staff on how to handle patrons that have prohibited items. Enforcement should be consistent and have a zero-tolerance policy.

     

    Implementation:

    Decide to:

    • Refuse admittance
    • Require they take item(s) back to their vehicle (what if they used public transportation)
    • Have a disposal bin and require they dispose item
    • Have them check the items at a bag check facility
    1. Best Practice:

    A specific policy should be established for lawful open and concealed gun carry on property and venue during an event.

     

    Private Citizens Review and follow state laws concerning private citizen concealed or open carry on property.

     

    VIP Protective Security Personnel It is recommended that these individuals not bring their weapons into the venue or check it into an onsite lockbox; if available.

     

    Objectives:

    • In some states, laws prescribe who can and cannot lawfully carry (particularly on state property). However, most states allow or are quiet on off-duty law enforcement.
    • Legal requirements related to concealed and open carry vary and are rapidly changing. Not only are there differences as to what is and is not allowed between states, but also for public and private properties. The goal is to offer safety, avoiding an accident or mistaken identity.

     

    Implementation:

    Consult legal counsel. Recommend to not allow concealed or open carry of firearms by private citizens or auxiliary/reserve officers (unless working) on the property (parking lots, venue, etc.).

     

    Producers should work with their venue management to ensure that all requisite signage and notifications are made to restrict concealed and open carry on property.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This will require coordination with the venue, as they may have an existing policy. This also will likely vary in some states between private vs public venues.

     

    Also worth noting that producer should inquire with any VIP or executive protection teams whether they will be armed. This information should be relayed to any onsite law enforcement and vice versa. Armed security, protection teams and police should all be aware of each others’ presence on site. 

    1. Best Practice:

    For those events where screening is required, establish written policies and conduct staff training for screening individuals and possessions. Procedures should include the use and deployment of staff and equipment.

    • Address any exceptions such as: medical devices/ equipment, VIPs, officials, etc.
    • If patrons refuse to be screened, they should be denied entry into the venue
    • Document training and testing

     

    Objectives:

    • To protect event from dangerous and unwanted items.
    • Legal defensibility

     

    Implementation:

    Test screening equipment and staff performance under actual live conditions and in real condition (i.e. red team tests).

     

    Whatever primary method is used for screening, have secondary or back-up devices/ methods.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    This will be dependent on RTV assessment, the type event, attendees, client, talent and overall threat.

    1. Best Practice:

    Inspect ALL possessions, items and/or containers that are permitted into the venue.

     

    Ensure sufficient lighting at all screening areas for evening events. All primary screening should be conducted by venue security staff and backed up by law enforcement.

     

    Objectives:

    Prevention/protection.

     

    Implementation:

    Clearly post signage concerning checks. Ensure that staff responsible for inspecting bags is properly trained. The DHS’s Sports Venue Bag Search Procedures Guide and “Check It” bag search video should be considered for staff training.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Be consistent.

    1. Best Practice:

    Conduct 100% screening of all individuals entering the venue.

     

    Objectives:

    Prevention/protection. The only way to prevent prohibited items from entering the venue.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Be consistent.

    1. Best Practice:

    Set up special entry lanes/doors around venue/ event for:

    • Patrons with NO items to screen (express lane/door/ gate)
    • Patrons with medical devices (oxygen tanks, medical syringes, wheelchairs, etc.)
    • Mothers with diaper bags for young children (must have child with them).

     

    Objectives:

    To expedite entry and ensure consistency.

     

    Implementation:

    Ensure sufficient signage to make patrons aware.

    1. Best Practice:

    The following signage measures should be used during all events. They should be displayed in highly visible and static locations:

    • Signage listing contact number(s) for security and/or safety personnel and for reporting suspicious activity
    • Signage in parking/transportation areas listing prohibited items and identifying acceptable containers
    • Signage at all pedestrian and vehicular access gates, indicating entrance is conditional upon screening and reiterating prohibited items
    • Signage throughout the venue that identifies current location relative to exits
    • Signage indicating what type of access (credentials) is allowed in a particular area
    • Signage directing deliveries to appropriate checkpoint and destination
    • Signage for emergency exits that are marked and lighted

     

    Objectives:

    • Signage is essential to the orderly conduct of an event.
    • Saves patrons from getting all the way to the venue doors with prohibited items and having to go back to their vehicle or abandoning the item(s) at the door or checking the item(s).
    • Many attendees may be unfamiliar with the venue and in an emergency may become confused.

     

    Implementation:

    Multiple methods may be employed including paper, wood, metal and video boards.

     

    Consider using social media as a method to communicate this information ahead of and during the event.

     

    Applicability/Scalability:

    Signage is especially important if you conduct screening and directing patrons.

     

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